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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
there was a feeling of jubilation, a sense of rebirth. pope paul v, in the year of our lord 1612, has brought water 35 miles from the healthiest springs in bracciano through new and restored aqueducts. what better way to sigl the revival of the ancient grandeur of rome than to restore its renowned system for bringing water from distant mountains to the city streets? pope paul's new water supply, the acqua paola, or paul's water as it was called, was soon rushing into the daylight from fountains all around the city. the finest of these fountains was designed by sculptor and architect, gian lorenzo bernini. it was built in the piazza navona which stood on foundations of an ancient stadium, a material expression of the idea of eternal rome. the city had survived 100 years of political and religious turmoil, of war and destruction. despite invasions of european monarchs who'd attempted to conquer the city on the pretext of defending it, it had preserved its independence. most important, the catholic church had survived the rise of protestantism and its challenge to rome's authority. it was an extraordinar
floodgates to fight rising unemployment. why was he holding back? four years later, chairman paul volcker set the fed on a course that would lead to the worst recession since the great depression. what could have been worth such a terrible price? on october 20, 1987, the heartbeat of the financial world nearly fluttered out. what could new fed chairman alan greenspan do to revive the patient? during the 1970s and '80s, the federal reserve adopted long-term policies to halt inflation and ease unemployment. but what would the fed do in an economic emergency? monetary policy -- how well does it work? that's the question economic analyst richard gill and i will investigate on this edition of "economics usa." i'm david schoumacher. the federal reserve board is responsible for deciding how much money the economy needs to grow. in the early 1970s, the fed held to a policy of using the money supply to try to keep the economy on course. in times of inflation, the fed tightened the money supply to squeeze excess dollars out of the economy. in times of recession, it increased the money supply to stimula
and the elderly. paul brennan is in rome. it has been a spectacular morning there, much to see, much to be heard. recap what you have seen so far. >> much to digest as well. it was going to be a momentous occasion, the inauguration of a new pope, just five years, the first since 2005. but in church terms that is relatively a quick succession. what we have is a huge crowd, a huge congregation, more than 130 countries represented in st. peter's. a very interesting homily from the pope are in the homily is the part of the mass where he can deliver his own text. it is not bound by the liturgy. he can speak with his own words about things that he cares about, and he chose to speak about principles, responsibility, tenderness, creation. what we took away from that was he was speaking about the protection of the environment. he said when men fail in this responsibility, that leads to destruction and hearts become hard. it is not just concern us as in the catholics, it concerns everybody. the protection of the whole of creation, the beauty of creation, it he hearkened back to st. francis of assisi. he s
at the global arms trade and joins me live from new york. paul, does anyone really know what the size of the global arms trade is and just how much of that is illegal? >> it's a very good question, very difficult to answer. some states do provide information about the financial value of their arms sales but this effort makes it a challenge to say a definite figure of how much the global arms trade amounts to. we estimate at least $50 billion but could be much more. in terms of how much of that is illegal, as we're discussing here in the u.n. niece next two weeks, we're hopeful we'll have a much clearer definition at the moment the u.n. arms embargo is decided by the security council and the laws and regulations that define what is legal or illegal in regards to the national arms trade. >> you talk about the meeting at the u.n. we know the u.n. arms treaty has been delayed before. how confident are you the countries involved will come to any kind of significant agreement this time around? >> i think it's a challenge but i think one of the big clouds of july, that the presidential elect
and the other, it makes it like null. isn't that nice? beats. question, paul? can you explain why laser discs are suppose to have a better sound quality than tapes? those laser discs amaze me. let me tell you what a laser disc does. you saw ted sang in here and showed you a particular wave. well, when ted did that-- ted maybe made a wave like that. now, what i wanna do is i wanna record that wave and give it back to you. the old way of doing it was just to have ted speak into a microphone, and when he spoke into the microphone, a little crystal would start to vibrate too. and the crystal vibrates like that, the electrons get squeezed up here and spread out here so that just pass through the wire. and as the crystal vibrates, the little electrons will vibrate too, just in rhythm, by the way, 'cause the electrons have hardly any inertia. and so you get an electrical signal and that would be brought over to a little needle that'd be riding on a waxed disc. and the needle would vibrate the same way and those vibrations would be caught up in the waxed disc. and you play it back and you-- hoop--you
paul ryan that would have cut programs such as medicaid and food stamps. the nigerian literary icon chinua achebe has died and at the age of 82. his novels, including the highly celebrated "things fall apart," provided a counterpoint to the colonial depiction of africa and helped give voice to a continent. in 2008 during a celebration of his birthday at the library of congress, chinua achebe was asked how the groundbreaking novel, published in 1958, had changed him. writinge process of "things fall apart, >> what it changed my life. because i had to invent the language of that story. something that anybody was teaching anywhere. the conversation between evo and english. make it up as i went along. >> chinua achebe died in boston after a brief illness. and those are some of the headlines. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. of the financial world are on the small mediterranean island of cyprus today. the government of cyprus has brokered a last-ditch $13 billion bailout deal with european officials to stave off the collapse of its ba
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)